Mr Nokia, Are your Lumia 920 Gorilla Glass Screens Defective?

In the last 6 weeks, my wife, my office (2 phones), my son, my step daughter, and my step grandchildren (2) upgraded their iPhones to Lumia 920s. We could have stayed with iPhones, or we could have chosen the Lumia 820 but we selected the 920 because the screen was made of Gorilla Glass. Whilst I did not believe Gorilla Glass to be unbreakable, I believed that it would better withstand an accidental drop. I was wrong! Within the course of last week, my son’s phone fell out of his pocket, my wife’s phone slid off the bonnet of her car, and my business partner’s  fell of a lounge (from a height of  only 30 cms from the ground). In each case the screen much their amazement cracked.

My Wife’s Phone

My Son’s Phone

My Business Partners Phone

It appears that these are not isolated incidents:

nokia Lumia 920 cracked gorilla glass , poor desig…

http://forums.whirlpool.net.au/archive/2043450

I accept that had my wife or my son were using an iPhone, those screens may have also cracked if dropped the same way. An iPhone screen most likely would not have cracked falling 30 cms. I have dropped them from much higher.

Your phones are advertised as being tough. You represent that they can hammer nails

Nokia uses Lumia 900 as a hammer in a torture test, makes us wince

Nokia Lumia 900 is tough as nails — literally

Whilst Gorilla Glass is not unbreakable, you represent it as being able to withstanding accidental drops.

In each of the above situations and those described in the above hyperlinks the screens should not have cracked. I can only conclude there was a defect in the gorilla glass on those phones, or there is design defect in the sculptured glass causing the screens to crack so easily. I note that there have been other reports of defective glass in the Nokia 900

Nokia Lumia 900 screen potentially weak from the inside, cracks from slight fall [Updated] – Gadget Review

How many Lumia 920 owners have suffered cracked screens in the same circumstances?

JDC 8 July 2013

Updated 9 July 2013

Advertisements

9 thoughts on “Mr Nokia, Are your Lumia 920 Gorilla Glass Screens Defective?

  1. edwarderick

    Thanks for sharing this post I also share with you some tip hope you like. If you’ve dropped your laptop—or dropped something on it—and the screen has fractured, the diagnosis is easy. Connect an external monitor to your notebook via its VGA-out port to verify that the notebook’s other components still work. If the laptop functions properly in all other respects, it’s time to start hunting for the parts to fix the screen. If your display problems aren’t the result of visible physical damage, however, the problem may not be the LCD. If your screen’s backlight flickers, shuts down after a few minutes of usage, or doesn’t come on at all, but you can still see a faint screen image, your problem may be the inverter, a small board that supplies power to the backlight. The good news is that these boards are available for well under $100. (We’ll show you how to locate and replace the inverter.) If replacing the inverter doesn’t solve the problem, the backlight itself may be faulty. If that’s the case, replacing the LCD should fix your problem.

    Reply
  2. Mustafa

    My Lumia 920 developed a hairline crack on the top right corner (where NOKIA is written) and It has never been dropped. I just updated the device, put it for charging at night and voila ! Good Morning Customer Care !
    Nokia is shameless and kept insisting I broke the device. I even volunteered to send it to them !
    Please read my experience and vote it useful so more people can be informed
    http://www.flipkart.com/reviews/RVOVBARPTBNDY4UDM

    Reply
  3. Hunter

    Dropped my phone off of a bench in the football locker room. Very small crack appeared. Then, I woke up the next morning (didnt touch the phone) and the crack had consumed my whole screen. Very disappointing

    Reply
  4. Tony

    I have noticed in the photos that there is not at AT&T logo and text in the Left corner. I think the phone without the complete logo and text are replacement glass on refurbished phones and they ate not actually “Gorilla Glass”. My sons phone was without a logo (refurbished) and happened to be dropped at the same time and distance, about 3 feet, as my original 920 and his cracked, mine was perfect. Landed on the same surface and at the same angle. I was holding both at the same time when I dropped them. Have been looking online to see if the replacement glass is gorilla class or just glass. No luck yet.

    Reply
    1. Jeffrey Chard Post author

      Tony thankyou for your comments. Two of the phones were supplied by Telstra in Australia. My Son’s was acquired new from an online retailer. They were not acquired from AA&T. I do not believe they were refurbished.

      If the glass breaks appears to a question of luck. Gorilla Glass 2 does not appear to be as strong as the original gorilla glass. If the responses from the poll is correct the glass has twice a better chance of surviving a fall from more than 60cm than higher fall a lower one

      Jeffrey

      Reply
      1. dave

        Hi, I am mr careful and yes I managed to break mine too ! The reason they break from a short drop is that it will be screen first, longer and the battery weight will make it rotate and land on it’s back, I love the phone, but for sure the screen is very very fragile, they will of course never admit it. Happily I managed to replace my screen and digitizer for 20 English pounds and all is well, but it leaves me paranoid it will happen again, I have owned many phones and have never so much as scratched them !

  5. V-man

    I have a brand new 920 Lumia that has an ATT logo on it. Dropped from approx 2 feet on the ground. The screen shattered just like the pictures above. No it was not a funny angle or extremely rare height. I was getting into my car and had it in my pant pocket. when I sat down in the driver seat, which is approx 2 feet off the ground, the phone slid out and landed face down on the asphalt. I used to have an iPhone 4S before the Nokia phone and dropped it down concrete stairs at work numerous times. The only damage was to the outer plastic edge of the phone (scratches only) How is this phone more durable than the iPhone? No clue… seems like a marketing gimmick to get people to buy the phone based on it’s “supposed” tougher glass.. not the case. Steer clear from this phone for several reasons.. it’s bulkiness, extra-slippery glass (I know it sounds crazy but this phone slides – yes literally slides off any non-hard surface when you put it face down ‘glass facing down’ e.g. couch, chair seat, bed, ottoman anything that is smooth cloth material. Something about the ultra-slippery glass finish…) not at all what I thought I was buying…smh.. back to the iPhone 4S until I get a newer phone .. will NOT be a Nokia product, that’s for sure 😦 I had very high hopes for this phone.. was very close to walking away from Apple for good.

    Reply
    1. Jeffrey Chard Post author

      My poll results show that twice as many people have broken screens from dropping their phones from less than 60 cm than those who drop them from a higher height. This may merely indicate it is more phones are dropped from lower heights. My conclusion is that there could be an inherent defect in the gorilla glass in some of the phones, which only becomes apparent when it is dropped. I am disappointed with Nokia’s lack of support and their refusal to recognise a problem.

      Reply
  6. Dave

    The new Gorilla Glass is very hard. It has a good scratch proof skill BUT! like the porcelain its very hard but its fragile. I prefer the flexible glasses, because I (and maybe everybody) use vinyl contra the scratches.

    Reply

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s